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The setting of The Red Lion, the changing room of a non-league football club, recalls the 70's Play for Today. At first glance, it seems too parochial for the West End with too esoteric a backdrop. Even the intimate confines of Trafalgar Studios’ smallest space has the whiff of fringe (along with body odour and wet grass). But Patrick Marber’s chamber piece, late of the National Theatre, revived here leaner, retooled and relocated to a North Eastern setting, proves the maxim that any story can be interesting if told with passion and an ear for what we sometimes call real lives.

Ever since they came into being in 2000, Michael Nunn and William Trevitt’s Balletboyz have been winning awards and wowing audiences with their work. Fourteen Days is no different and continues in their tradition of collaborating with various choreographers and composers.  

This is a powerful debut for Kyle Abraham at Sadler’s Wells. Set in choreographer Kyle Abraham's historically black neighbourhoods, Homewood and the Hill District of Pittsburgh, Pavement is inspired by (and includes audio from) 1991's coming of age movie Boyz n The Hood.  

At the age of 16, not many school kids know what they want to do with their lives and careers. In the microcosm of the classroom, teenage dreams wax and wane as students struggle to find their identity while being pressed into making decisions about their future without all the facts.

After it’s critically acclaimed run at Bristol Old Vic, The Grinning Man opened its doors to a lucky few for an exclusive peek on how the show is shaping up prior to its run at Trafalgar Studios. It did not disappoint.

Political plays are not my usual go-to when looking at shows in the West End. There’s no real reason why, I just tend to find big lavish musicals more exciting. However, when Labour of Love was announced to be starring Martin Freeman and Tamsin Greig (though it was Sarah Lancashire originally) I couldn’t resist the urge to give it a try.

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